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Notre-Dame Cathedral, commonly known as Notre-Dame, is the cathedral of the archdiocese of Paris, located on the Ile de la Cité.
For many centuries, the cathedral is one of the largest in the West.
Long the highest construction of the city, it is one of the most emblematic monuments of Paris.
She has inspired many works, including the novel by Victor Hugo Notre-Dame de Paris.
At the beginning of the twenty-first century, the cathedral is visited every year by some 13 to 14 million people.
The building, also a minor basilica, is thus the most visited monument of Paris and Europe.

Begun at the instigation of Bishop Maurice de Sully, its construction extends over more than two centuries, from 1163 to the middle of the fourteenth century.
After the French Revolution, the cathedral enjoyed between 1844 and 1864 an important restoration, sometimes controversial, under the direction of the architect Viollet-le-Duc, which incorporates elements and new motifs.
For these reasons, the style is not of total uniformity: the cathedral possesses primitive Gothic and glowing Gothic characters.
The two rosettes, which adorn each arm of the transept, are among the largest in Europe.

Building both religious and heritage, it is linked to many episodes in the history of France.
Royal parish church in the Middle Ages, it welcomed the arrival of the Holy Crown in 1239, then the coronation of Napoleon I in 1804, the baptism of the Duke of Bordeaux in 1821 and the funeral of several presidents of the Third Republic (Adolphe Thiers, Sadi Carnot, Paul Doumer).
It is also under its vaults that a Magnificat is sung during the liberation of Paris in 1944 and that ceremonies take place on the death of presidents Charles de Gaulle (
), Georges Pompidou (
) and François Mitterrand (
).

In 2013, the 850th anniversary of its construction is celebrated